Critique of this forum



  • When this forum started, we made a conscious decision
    to focus the discussion on product design, which is difficult,
    and not implementation, which is easy.
    Time to make a course correction?

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  • How about we run this discussion for a while, see what others have to think? Makes it a bit more democratic, doesn't it?



  • A lot of the posts on this forum seem to revolve around
    partially executed product ideas.
    I think we could use a few posts on the process used
    to arrive at such ideas.
    That should get the ball rolling on the design side.
    Perhaps you guys could do an invited post to kick-start this,
    from one of the local VCs with a tech background, for example.
    Or from someone who''s already a serial entrepreneur in India,
    though that might be harder to find.

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  • I hear you on that. We have something along those lines in the pipeline, coming right up - should take a couple of days to roll out :D



  • Awesome! Can't wait to read it.

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  • Of the top 8 successful Indian start-ups,
    each of which has a valuation of over a billion dollars,
    only one, Mu Sigma is in the data analytics space.
    All the other 7 are in the e-commerce space.
    They have differentiated themselves,
    not on the quality of their technology,
    but in the way they have grown their businesses.
    I suspect a majority of the start-ups on this forum
    fall into that camp.
    Seems like we should be discussing business
    more than technology.

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  • @Rohit-Agarwal Spot on. Every startup needs to focus on the problem it is trying to solve, and then work towards that with whatever technology that makes sense. The technology used never makes or breaks a business (unless it is very dependent on it, like some feature on Android that may not be available on iOS), but the entrepreneurs ability to appeal, approach and attract the target audience does. Constant innovation in that area is what the technology should support. If you choose a tech stack that resist's change (I think none of the currently active stacks does that), then you are in for trouble. Else you are good.



  • I guess one area that a start-up could work on in India,
    where every other start-up is not working (i.e. e-commerce)
    is the tools space.
    Since there's so many start-ups around nowadays,
    I read China is creating 10000 start-ups everyday,
    if a start-up built tools that helped start-ups go about their business,
    like this website for example, that might be a viable area of work.
    Of course a lot of the main development tools used by the mainstream
    are under open source,
    but with the recent growth in the number of start-ups,
    there is probably scope in this space for more tools.
    Also, tools is an area that's a lot more technology related,
    as opposed to e-commerce which is mostly business.
    Since most start-up founders these days are techies,
    they might have a better chance of success
    in the more techie tools space.

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  • Most forums on the internet use text as a medium for discussion, which IMHO ,is a bit outdated. I think we should be using audio and video based discussions(real-time if possible) as they are far more productive. Technologies like webrtc, etc. have made the technology requirements for such forums quite minimal too. In my experience, few lines of text input by anyone is hardly enough to get complex points across.



  • @Rohit-Agarwal I agree with your assessment that there is a need for tools startups. In fact, I am working on one such project at the moment. It allows software developers to embed audio and video comments that describes a piece of code into their source code along with text comments. It also gives developers the ability to store all the research they did for writing a particular piece of code.

    However, I must also warn against doing a startup just because there is an opening in the market for a particular service. IMO, a person can only do 2 to 3 startups in his/her life. One must choose carefully where you choose to invest your time and do things that are genuinely valuable.



  • @p_chhonker
    There's so many start-ups being started these days,
    that I think 2 or 3 out of a hundred could do tools
    while the other 97 could do e-commerce.
    Techie's don't enjoy the slog involved in the business development
    of a typical e-commerce start-up.
    Tools are a lot more intellectually satisfying,
    since your customers are developers.

    Long term, e-commerce start-ups don't really help our industry.
    Tools and other core technology start-ups do.

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  • @p_chhonker Agree with you, on that. And I've been thinking a lot along those lines, and I'll be contacting you soon about building something on notCRUD around A/V using WebRTC. Thanks for that! :)

    @Rohit-Agarwal You always do hit the nail on the head. So, we're rolling out some new content pretty soon, geared towards analyzing with a massive amount of depth, how such tools came into existence as products. We're sorting out some things around putting that content out, and it's taking a bit longer than we thought. But in a few days, for sure.



  • Thanks @p_chhonker. Always welcome.

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  • FWIW Druvaa, pubmatic, inmobi are not that behind ecom startups. They actually might already be in unicorn club, only that there last funding rounds were couple of years ago, so valuations are bit dated.

    Also did you mean China is creating 10000 startups every year instead of day? 10K/day will be really too much :)



  • I read that number in yesterday''s Hindustan Times.
    Seems like the government is behind this push.
    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/business/10000-startups-a-day-being-set-up-in-china-to-boost-economy/articleshow/49309225.cms

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  • @rudimk Anytime. Would be glad to help :)


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